Guide to Less Waste in the Kitchen

 

You can make up the difference. We are so price sensitive in the store, and 10 cents will swing us one way or other, but in the kitchen we throw out so much money without even thinking about price. It is not good for our wallet and definitely not good for the environment. Here are some tips to reduce our waste in the kitchen:

  • Use reusable bags.

We still use and discard nearly 1 trillion plastic bags a year! Bring your own bulk shopping bags (love the hemp and organic cotton ones but any reusable bags would suit! )  and keep them in your backpack/purse. You can also buy fruits and veggies with no bags at all as I always do at my organic coop.

  • Use a reusable bottle.

It requires 3 times the amount of water to produce a plastic bottle than it does to fill it. Bringing your own bottle limit that.

  • Reduce fast food or Bring Your Own Containers.

The biggest source (49 percent) of litter is fast food. If fast food is the only option, opt out of napkins, straws, condiments or plastic utensils.

  • Buy in Bulk.

Don’t confuse purchasing bulk foods with buying in bulk from a large big box store. The items you can find in bulk bins are endless: dried fruits, mixed grains, nuts, dry beans, flours (including GF flours), spices and herbs, ground and whole bean coffee, seeds (including chia and flax), dry pasta (including GF pasta), nutritional yeast and other odds, etc… Shopping the bulk bins allows you to get just what you need rather than paying for too much and the packaging. Buying bulk foods reduces food packaging waste and is better for our planet. It will save you an average of 14%- Organic bulk foods on average are 89 percent less expensive than their organic packaged counterparts. Buying in bulk allows you to try new things. Do not forget to take your own containers or re-use containers (make sure to get the tare weight if using your own).

O Bocal, a beautiful shop in Nantes, France.

  • Ditch paper towels.

Every day, over 3000 tons of paper towel waste is produced in the US alone. To make one ton of paper towels, 17 trees are cut down and 20,000 gallons of water are consumed. The average person uses 2400-3000 paper towels in a year…ONLY at work!!

  • Do not throw away the leftovers

Yes! You can use the almonds pulp (also called okara), aquafaba from chickpeas and beans….the list is endless: you can use your creativity or you can find easily tons of recipes with vegan leftovers, it’s just about having fun in the kitchen.. 😉

  • Give back to the Earth by composting

It doesn’t matter if you have a garden it is always possible to compost!! Composting is nature’s way of breaking down biodegradable materials to form a rich soil used by gardeners and small farmers – But not ONLY! Everyone can do and should.