Guide to Less Waste in the Kitchen


You can make up the difference. We are so price sensitive in the store, and 10 cents will swing us one way or other, but in the kitchen we throw out so much money without even thinking about price. It is not good for our wallet and definitely not good for the environment. Here are some tips to reduce our waste in the kitchen:

  • Use reusable bags.

We still use and discard nearly 1 trillion plastic bags a year! Bring your own bulk shopping bags (love the hemp and organic cotton ones but any reusable bags would suit! )  and keep them in your backpack/purse. You can also buy fruits and veggies with no bags at all as I always do at my organic coop.

  • Use a reusable bottle.

It requires 3 times the amount of water to produce a plastic bottle than it does to fill it. Bringing your own bottle limit that.

  • Reduce fast food or Bring Your Own Containers.

The biggest source (49 percent) of litter is fast food. If fast food is the only option, opt out of napkins, straws, condiments or plastic utensils.

  • Buy in Bulk.

Don’t confuse purchasing bulk foods with buying in bulk from a large big box store. The items you can find in bulk bins are endless: dried fruits, mixed grains, nuts, dry beans, flours (including GF flours), spices and herbs, ground and whole bean coffee, seeds (including chia and flax), dry pasta (including GF pasta), nutritional yeast and other odds, etc… Shopping the bulk bins allows you to get just what you need rather than paying for too much and the packaging. Buying bulk foods reduces food packaging waste and is better for our planet. It will save you an average of 14%- Organic bulk foods on average are 89 percent less expensive than their organic packaged counterparts. Buying in bulk allows you to try new things. Do not forget to take your own containers or re-use containers (make sure to get the tare weight if using your own).

O Bocal, a beautiful shop in Nantes, France.

  • Ditch paper towels.

Every day, over 3000 tons of paper towel waste is produced in the US alone. To make one ton of paper towels, 17 trees are cut down and 20,000 gallons of water are consumed. The average person uses 2400-3000 paper towels in a year…ONLY at work!!

  • Do not throw away the leftovers

Yes! You can use the almonds pulp (also called okara), aquafaba from chickpeas and beans….the list is endless: you can use your creativity or you can find easily tons of recipes with vegan leftovers, it’s just about having fun in the kitchen.. 😉

  • Give back to the Earth by composting

It doesn’t matter if you have a garden it is always possible to compost!! Composting is nature’s way of breaking down biodegradable materials to form a rich soil used by gardeners and small farmers – But not ONLY! Everyone can do and should.


Our Raw Nut Butters

As usual, we are cooking simple…and we got almost 5kg of almonds from the organic shop (FOR FREE!!) soooo had a lot to do.

With a proper blender, just blend the almonds until they become a paste, buttery texture 🙂

You can use any nuts : cashews, hazelnuts, peanuts, …

You can toast them too just a lil’ bit before mixing.

The transformation of Silence into Language and Action*

from the book “Sister Outsider” by Audre Lorde

I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood. That the speaking profits me, beyond any other effect. I am standing here as a Black lesbian poet, and the meaning of all that waits upon the fact that I am still alive, and might not have been. Less than two months ago I was told by two doctors, one female and one male, that I would have to breast surgery, and that there was a 60 to 80 percent chance that the tumor was malignant. Between that telling and the actual surgery, there was a three-week period of the agony of an involuntary reorganization of my entire life. The surgery was completed, and the growth was benign.

But within those three weeks, I was forced to look upon myself and my living with a harsh and urgent clarity that has left me still shaken but much stronger. This is a situation faced by many women, by some of you here today. Some of what I experienced during that time has helped elucidate for me much of what I feel concerning the transformation of silence into language and action.

In becoming forcibly and essentially aware of my mortality, and of what I wished and wanted for my life, however short it might be, priorities and omissions became strongly etched in a merciless light, and what I most regretted were my silences. Of what had I ever been afraid? To question or to speak as I believed could have meant pain, or death. But wa all hurt in so many different ways, all the time, and pain will either change or end. Death, on the other hand, is the final silence. And that might be coming quickly; now, without regard for whether I had ever spoken what needed to be said, or had only betrayed myself into small silences, while I planned someday to speak, or waited for someone else’s words. And I began to recognize a source of power within myself that comes from the knowledge that while it is most desirable not to be afraid, learning to put fear into a perspective gave me great strength.

I was going to die, if not sooner then later, whether or not I had ever spoken myself. My silences had not protected me. Your silence will not protect you. But for every real word spoken, for every attempt I had ever made to speak those truths for which I am still seeking, I had made contact with other women while we examined the words to fit a world in which we all believed, bringing our differences. And it was the concern and caring of all those women which gave me strength and enabled me to scrutinize the essentials of my living.

The women who sustained me through that period were Black and white, old and young, lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual, and we all shared a war against the tyrannies of silence. They all gave me a strength and concern without which I could not have survived intact. Within those weeks of acute fear came the knowledge – within the war we are all waging with the forces of death; subtle and otherwise, conscious or not – I am not only a casualty, I am also a warrior.

What are the words you do not yet have? What do you need to say? What are the tyrannies you swallow day by day and attempt to make your own, until you will sicken and die of them, still in silence? Perhaps for some of you here today, I am the face of one of your fears. Because I am woman, because I am Black, because I am lesbian, because I am myself – a Black woman warrior poet doing my work – come to ask you, are you doing yours?


And of course I am afraid, because the transformation of silence into language and action is an act of self-revelation, and that always seems fraught with danger. But my daughter, when I told her of our topic and my difficulty with it, said, “Tell them about how you’re never really a whole person if you remain silent, because there’s always that one little piece inside you that wants to be spoken out, and if you keep ignoring it, it gets madder and madder and hotter and hotter, and if you don’t speak it out one day it will just up and punch you in the mouth from the inside.”

In the cause of silence, each of us draws the face of her own fear – fear of contempt, of censure, or some judgment, or recognition, of challenge, of annihilation. But most of all, I think, we fear the visibility without which we cannot truly live. Within this country where racial difference creates a constant, if unspoken, distortion of vision, Black women have on one hand always been highly visible, and so, on the other hand, have been rendered invisible through the depersonalization of racism. Even within the women’s movement, we have had to fight, and still do, for that very visibility which also renders us most vulnerable, our Blackness. For to survive in the mouth of this dragon we call america, we have had to learn this first and most vital lesson – that we were never meant to survive. Not as human beings. And neither were most of you here today, Black or not. And that visibility which makes us most vulnerable is that which also is the source of our greatest strength. Because the machine will try to grind you into dust anyway, whether or not we speak. We can sit in our corners mute forever while our sisters and our selves are wasted, while our children are distorted and destroyed, while our earth is poisoned; we can sit in our safe corners mute as bottles, and we will still be no less afraid.

In my house this year we are celebrating the feast of Kwanza, the African-american festival of harvest which begins the day after Christmas and lasts for seven days. There are seven principles of Kwanza, one for each day. The first principle is Umoja, which means unity, the decision to strive for and maintain unity in self and community. The principle for yesterday, the second day, was Kujichagulia – self-determination – the decision to define ourselves, name ourselves, and speak for ourselves, instead of being defined and spoken for by others. Today is the third day of Kwanza, and the principle for today is Ujima – collective work and responsibility – the decision to build and maintain ourselves and our communities together and to recognize and solve our problems together.

Each of us is here now because in one way or another we share a commitment to language and to the power of language, and to the reclaiming of that language which has been made to work against us. In the transformation of silence into language and action, it is vitally necessary for each one of us to establish or examine her function in that transformation and to recognize her role as vital within that transformation.

For those of us who write, it is necessary to scrutinize not only the truth of what we speak, but the truth of that language by which we speak it. For others, it is to share and spread also those words that are meaningful to us. But primarily for us all, it is necessary to teach by living and speaking those truths which we believe and know beyond understanding. Because in this way alone we can survive, by taking part in a process of life that is creative and continuing, that is growth.

And it is never without fear – of visibility, of the harsh light of scrutiny and perhaps judgment, of pain, of death. But we have lived through all of those already, in silence, except death. And I remind myself all the time now that if I were to have been born mute, or had maintained an oath of silence my whole life long for safety, I would still have suffered, and I would still die. It is very good for establishing perspective.

And where the words of women are crying to be heard, we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives. That we not hide behind the mockeries of separations that have been imposed upon us and which so often we accept as our own. For instance, “I can’t possibly teach Black women’s writing – their experience is so different from mine.” Yet how many years have you spent teaching Plato and Shakespeare and Prout? Or another, “She’s a white woman and what could she possibly have to say to me?” Or, “She’s a lesbian, what would my husband say, or my chairman?” Or again, “This woman writes of her sons and I have no children.” And all the other endless ways in which we rob ourselves and each other.

We can learn to work and speak when we are afraid in the same way we have learned to work and speak when we are tired. For we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition, and while we wait in silence for that final luxury of fearlessness, the weight of that silence will choke us

The fact that we are here and that I speak these words is an attempt to break that silence and bridge some of those differences between us, for it is not difference which immobilizes us, but silence And there are so many silences to be broken.

The end of suffering and the discovery of happiness (excerpt)

The first turning of the wheel of Dharma


Just as there are three types of training – in wisdom, concentration, and morality – the Buddhist scriptures contain three divisions – discipline, sets of discourses, and knowledge.

Both male and female practitioners have an equal need to practice these three trainings, although there are differences in the vows they take. The basic foundation of the practice of morality is restraint from the ten unwholesome actions: three pertaining to the body, four pertaining to speech, and three pertaining to thought.

The three physical nonvirtues are:

  1. Taking the life of a living being, from and insect up to a human being.
  2. Stealing, taking away another’s property without his consent, regardless of its value, and whether or not you do it yourself.
  3. Sexual misconduct, committing adultery.


The four verbal nonvirtues are:

  1. Lying, deceiving others through spoken work or gesture.
  2. Divisiveness, creating dissesion by causing those in agreement to disagree or those in disagreement to disagree further.
  3. Harshness, abusing others.
  4. Senselessness, talking about foolish things motivated by desire and so forth.

The three mental nonvirtues are:

  1. Covetousness, desiring to possess something that belongs to another.
  2. Harmful intent, wishing to injure others, be it in a great or small way.
  3. Wrong view, viewing some existent thing such as rebirth, cause and effect, or the Three Jewels as non-existent.

The morality practiced by those who observe the monastic way of life is referred to as the discipline of individual liberation (Pratimoksha). In India there were four major schools of tenets, later producing 18 branches, which each preserved their own version of the Pratimoksha, the original discourse spoken by the Buddha, which laid down the guidelines for monastic life. The practice observed in the Tibetan monasteries follows the Mulasarvastavadin tradition in which 253 precepts are prescribed for fully ordained monks, or bhikshus. In the Theravadan tradition, the individual liberation vow of monks comprises 227 precepts.

In providing you with an instrument of mindfulness and alertness, the practice of morality protects you from indulging in negative actions. Therefore, it is the foundation of the Buddhist path. The second phase is meditation; it leads the practitioner to the second training, which is concerned with concentration.


Meditation in the general Buddhist sense is of two types – absorptive and analytical meditation. The first refers to the practice of the calmly abiding or single-pointing mind, and the second to the practice of analysis. In both cases, it is very important to have a firm foundation of mindfulness and alertness, which is provided by the practice of morality. These two factors – mindfulness and alertness – are important not only in meditation, but also in our day-to-day lives.

We speak of many different states of meditation, such as the form or formless states. The form states are differentiated on the basis of their branches, whereas the formless states are differentiated on the basis of the nature of the object of absorption.

We take the practice of morality as the foundation and the practice of concentration as a complementary factor, an instrument, to make the mind serviceable. So, later, when you undertake the practice of wisdom, you are equipped with such a single-pointed mind that you can direct all your attention and energy to the chosen object. In the practice of wisdom, you meditate on the selflessness or emptiness of phenomena, which serves as the actual antidote to the disturbing emotions.

The 37 Aspects of Enlightment

The general structure of the Buddhist path, as outlined in the first turning of the wheel of Dharma, consists of the 37 aspects of enlightenment. These begin with the four mindfulnesses, which refer to mindfulness of the body, feelings, mind and phenomena. Here, however, mindfulness refers to meditation on the suffering nature of cyclic existence, by means of which practitioners develop a true determination to be free from this cycle of existence.

Next are the four complete abandonments, because when practitioners develop a true determination to be free through the practice of the four mindfulnesses, they engage in a way of life in which they abandon the causes of the future suffering and cultivate the causes of future happiness.

Since overcoming all negative actions and disturbing emotions, and increasing positive factors within your mind, which are technically called the class of pure phenomena, can be achieved only when you have a very concentrated mind, there follow what are called the four factors of miraculous powers.

Next come what are known as the five faculties, five powers, eightfold noble path, and seven branches of the path to enlightenment.

This is the general structure of the Buddhist path as laid down in the first turning of the wheel of Dharma. Buddhism as practiced in the Tibetan tradition completely incorporates all these features of the Buddhist doctrine.


The second turning of the wheel of Dharma

In the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, the Buddha taught the Perfection of Wisdom or Prajnaparamita sutras on the Vuture’s Peak, outside Rajgir.

The second turning of the wheel of Dharma should be seen as expanding upon the topics which the Buddha had expounded during the first turning of the wheel. In the second turning, he not only taught the truth of suffering, that suffering should be recognized as suffering, but emphasized the importance of identifying both your own suffering as well as that of all sentient beings, so it is much more extensive. When he taught the origin of suffering in the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, he referred not to the disturbing emotions alone, but also to the subtle imprints they leave behind, so this explanation is more profound.

The truth of cessation is also explained much more profoundly. In the first turning of the wheel of Dharma, cessation is merely identified, whereas in the Perfection of Wisdom sutras the Buddha explains the nature of this cessation and its characteristics in great detail. He describes the path by which sufferings can be ceased and what the actual state called cessation is.

The truth of the path is similarly dealt with more profoundly in the Perfection of Wisdom sutras. The Buddha taught a unique path comprising the realization of emptiness, the true nature of all phenomena, combined with compassion and the mind of enlightenment, the altruistic wish to achieve enlightenment for the sake of all sentient beings. Because he spoke of this union of method and wisdom in the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, we find that the second turning develops and expands on the first turning of the wheel of Dharma.

Although the four noble truths were explained more profoundly during the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, this is not because certain features were explained in the second that were not explained in the first. That cannot be the reason, because many topics are explained in non-Buddhist systems which are not explained in Buddhism, but that does not mean that other systems are more profound than Buddhism. The second turning of the wheel of Dharma explains and develops certain aspects of the four noble truths, which were not explained in the first turning of the wheel, but which do not contradict the general structure of the Buddhist path described in that first discourse. Therefore, the explanation found in the second is said to be more profound.

Yet, in the discourses of the second turning of the wheel we also find certain presentations that do contradict the general structure of the path as described of sutras, some which are taken at face value and are thought of as literally true, whereas others require the four reliances, we divide the sutras into two categories – the definitive and the interpretable.

These four reliances consist of advice to rely on the teaching, not on the person; within the teachings rely on the meaning, not on mere words; rely on definitive sutras, not those requiring interpretation; and rely on the deeper understanding of wisdom, not on the knowledge of ordinary awareness.

This approach can be found in the Buddha’s own words, as when he said: “O bhiksus and wise men, do not accept what I say just out of respect for me, but first subject it to analysis and rigorous examination.”

In the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, the Perfection of Wisdom sutras, the Buddha further explained the subject of cessation, particularly with regard to emptiness, in a more elaborate and extensive way. Therefore, the Great Vehicle approach is to interpret those sutras on two levels: the literal meaning, which concerns the presentation of emptiness, and the hidden meaning which concerns the latent explanation of the stages of the path.


The third turning of the wheel of Dharma

The third turning of the wheel contains many different sutras, the most important of which is the Tathagata Essence sutra, which is actually the source for Nagarjuna’s Collection of Praises and also Maitreya’s treatise the Sublime Continuum. In this sutra, the Buddha further explores topics he had touched on in the second turning of the wheel, but not from the objective viewpoint of emptiness, because emptiness was explained to its fullest, highest, and most profound degree in the second turning. What is unique about the third turning is that Buddha taught certain ways of heightening the wisdom which realizes emptiness from the point of view of subjective mind.

The Buddha’s explanation of the view of emptiness in the second turning of the wheel, in which he taught about the lack of inherent existence, was too profound for many practitioners to comprehend. For some, to say phenomena lack inherent existence seems to imply that they do not exist at all. So, for the benefit of these practitioners, in the third turning of the wheel the Buddha qualified the object of emptiness with different interpretations.

For example, in the Sutra Unraveling the Thought of the Buddha, he differentiated various types of emptiness by categorizing all phenomena into three classes: imputed phenomena, which refers to their empty nature. He spoke of the various emptinesses of these different phenomena, the various ways of lacking inherent existence, and the various meanings of the lack of inherent existence of these different phenomena. So, the two major schools of thoughts of the Great Vehicle, the Middle Way (Madhyamika) and the Mind Only (Chittamatra), arose in India on the basis of these differences of presentation.

Next is the Tantric Vehicle, which I think has some connection with the third turning of the wheel. The word tantra means “continuity”. The Yoga Tantra text called the Ornament of the Vajra Essence Tantra explains that tantra is a continuity referring to the continuity of consciousness or mind. It is on the basis of this mind that on the ordinary level we commit negative actions, as a result of which we go through the vicious cycle of life and death. On the spiritual path, it is also on the basis of this continuity of consciousness that we are able to make mental improvements, experience high realizations of the path, and so forth. And it is also on the basis of this continuity of consciousness that we are able to achieve the ultimate state of omniscience. So, this continuity of consciousness is always present, which is the meaning of tantra, or continuity.

I feel there is a bridge between the sutras and tantras in the second and third turnings of the wheel, because in the second, the Buddha taught certain sutras which have different levels of meaning. The explicit meaning of the Perfection of Wisdom sutra is emptiness, whereas the implicit meaning is the stages of the paths which are to be achieved as a result of realizing emptiness. The third turning was concerned with different ways of heightening the wisdom which realizes emptiness. So I think there is a link here between sutra and tantra.

Different Explanations of Selflessness

From a philosophical point of view, the criterion for distinguishing a school as Buddhist is whether or not it accepts the four seals: that all composite phenomena are impermanent by nature, contaminated phenomena are of the nature of suffering, all phenomena are empty and selfless, and nirvana alone is peace. Any system accepting these seals is philosophically a Buddhist school of thought. In the Great Vehicle schools of thought, selflessness is explained more profoundly, at a deeper level.

Now, let me explain the difference between selflessness as explained in the second turning of the wheel and that explained in the first.

Let us examine our own experience, how we relate to things. For example, when I use this rosary here, I feel it is mine and I have attachment o it. If you examine the attachment you feel for your own possessions, you find there are different levels of attachment. One is the feeling that there is a self-sufficient person existing as a separate entity independent of your own body and mind, which feels that this rosary is “mine.”

When you are able, through meditation, to perceive the absence of such a self-sufficient person, existing in isolation from your own body and mind, you are able to reduce the strong attachment you feel toward your possessions. But you may also feel that there are still some subtle levels of attachment. Although you may not feel a subjective attachment from your own side in relation to the person, because of the rosary’s beautiful appearance, its beautiful color, and so forth, you feel a certain level of attachment to it in that a certain objective entity exists out there. So, in the second turning of the wheel, the Buddha taught that selflessness is not confined to the person alone, but that it applies to all phenomena. When you realize this, you will be able to overcome all forms of attachment and delusion.




Miraculous Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) is a plant rich in amino acids, vitamins A, C, F, B, niacin, and has traces of vitamin B12, with awesome anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, healing, and soothing benefits for your skin, but also hair and intestines. I believe everyone should grow this beautiful precious plant…


  • Sunburn Remedy: Lots of chemicals and preservatives are found in beauty products, even vegan and organic ones. It is cheap and easy to get rid of your sunburns…
  • Cleansing Juice: because it contains vitamins and minerals, using a small amount of aloe vera gel (skin off), you can add to your organic fresh juices. Drink to lower blood sugar levels—especially for diabetics. Drink to help ease congestion, stomach ulcers, colitis, hemorrhoids, urinary tract infections and prostate problems.
  • Moisturising face mask
  • Aloe vera reduces irritated skin, rashes, itchy bites..
  • Exfoliant and moisturise – slice a piece of the leave, sprinkle some sugar onto the flesh and just spread over your body an hour or two before having a shower.
  • Acne treatment: it is anti-microbial so it clears off the bacteria. Apply the aloe over the face.
  • Hair conditioner: Help hair growth, prevents itching on the scalp, reduces dandruff and conditions your hair!
  • Clear sinuses and airways: Boil leaves in a pan of water and breathe in the vapor to alleviate asthma

Make sure to get rid of the yellow liquid (aloe vera latex) as it may cause some rashes on your skin and probably other intestinal problems… To remove aloe latex, you should peel the thin layer of leaf first. After extracting the gel like substance, you will find the latex fluid under the leaf.

Best food combinations to maximise your energy! – 80/10/10 –

This is based on my personal experiences with food/nutrition/sport and I am doing better when I am eating this way. I’m not saying that you HAVE to eat this way, I just share with you a way to maximise your energy with easier digestion….

Wherever I stay, I always bring this to put on my kitchen closets/shelves to check and do the right combo. Eat the energy you want to become.


Basically, what are we talking about in terms of foods? 80/10/10 works out easily and naturally 
if your calories break down approximately as follows:

90 to 97% from sweet and nonsweet fruits
2 to 6% from tender, leafy greens and celery
0 to 8% from everything else (other vegetables like cabbage and broccoli, plus fatty fruits, nuts, and seeds)

You can generally accomplish this with two or three large fruit meals during the day, plus a large salad in the evening. 
Fruit predominates heavily, yet you consume as many greens as you like.

Main Source: the 80/10/10 by Douglas N. Graham



The information contained in The 80/10/10 Diet is provided for your general information only. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. Dr. Douglas Graham does not give medical advice or engage in the practice of medicine. Under no circumstances does Dr. Graham recommend particular treatment for specific individuals, and he recommends in all cases that you consult your physician or a qualified practitioner before pursuing any course of treatment or making any changes to your diet or medications. — Douglas N. Graham, DC

Over and over again, I hear people saying they’ve tried “everything” to lose weight—low fat, high fat, low carb, high carb, low protein, high protein, all kinds of pills, shots, powders, and shakes—you name it and they say they’ve tried it. The main cause of their failure is misinformation. There are reasons for each of these dietary failures. What they were told was “low fat,” usually 30%, actually is not low fat at all, and they have no idea how to get to an effective low-fat 10% as described in this book. High-fat diets can be dangerous and put you at risk for the diseases that most Westerners die from prematurely. Low-carb diets are also dangerous, and most people have no idea that the ideal diet consists of 80% carbs.

But, it must be the right carbs.



Other Fundamental Elements of Health

Are You Thriving or Surviving?

Rate yourself, from zero to ten, in each of the following areas.


1. Clean, fresh air

2. Pure water

3. Foods for which we are biologically designed

4. Sufficient sleep

5. Rest and relaxation

6. Vigorous activity

7. Emotional poise and stability

8. Sunshine and natural light

9. Comfortable temperature

10. Peace, harmony, serenity, and tranquility

11. Human touch

12. Thought, cogitation, and meditation

13. Friendships and companionship

14. Gregariousness (social relationships, community)

15. Love and appreciation

16. Play and recreation

17. Pleasant environment

18. Amusement and entertainment

19. Sense of humor, mirth, and merriment

20. Security of life and its means

21. Inspiration, motivation, purpose, and commitment

22. Creative, useful work (pursuit of interests)

23. Self-control and self-mastery

24. Individual sovereignty

25. Expression of reproductive instincts

26. Satisfaction of the aesthetic senses

27. Self-confidence

28. Positive self-image and sense of self-worth

29. Internal and external cleanliness

30. Smiles

31. Music and all other arts

32. Biophilia (love of nature)

A beautiful piece from “the invitation”


Photography by JR


It doesn't interest me what you do for a living. I want to know what you ache for and if you dare to dream of meeting your heart's longing.

It doesn't interest me how old you are. I want to know if you will risk looking like a fool for love, for your dream, for the adventure of being alive.

It doesn't interest me what planets are squaring your moon. I want to know if you have touched the centre of your own sorrow, if you have been opened by life's betrayals or have become shrivelled and closed from fear of further pain.

I want to know if you can sit with pain, mine or your own, without moving to hide it, or fade it, or fix it.

I want to know if you can be with joy, mine or your own; if you can dance with wildness and let the ecstasy fill you to the tips of your fingers and toes without cautioning us to be careful, be realistic, remember the limitations of being human.

It doesn't interest me if the story you are telling me is true. I want to know if you can disappoint another to be true to yourself. If you can bear the accusation of betrayal and not betray your own soul. If you can be faithless and therefore trustworthy.

I want to know if you can see Beauty even when it is not pretty every day. And if you can source your own life from its presence.

I want to know if you can live with failure, yours and mine, and still stand at the edge of the lake and shout to the silver of the full moon, 'Yes.'

It doesn't interest me to know where you live or how much money you have. I want to know if you can get up after the night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone and do what needs to be done to feed the children.

It doesn't interest me who you know or how you came to be here. I want to know if you will stand in the centre of the fire with me and not shrink back.

It doesn't interest me where or what or with whom you have studied. I want to know what sustains you from the inside when all else falls away.

I want to know if you can be alone with yourself and if you truly like the company you keep in the empty moments.

From dumpster to dinner plate

Listening to "LA REVOLTE" 

It’s hard to imagine any of the commuters you will see in the centre of your city, for example, not owning a watch or a good pair of shoes or any of the other essentials to get them through the day. And everywhere they go there’s another ad or a store trying to sell them more. That’s consumerism in a nutshell. Something doesn’t work anymore? — Buy a new one! Need a change? — Buy something new!

The 90’s were a decade that brought us the extreme shopping channel, the dot-com bubble and more luxuries that we could ever imagine. But then, the bubble burst. Wall Street crumbled and we got slammed by a once in a life time recession. Then we paused for a moment to reassess…




Capitalism is the childish idea that there’s no suck thing as too much



Food goes to trash while millions starve


Freegans are people who employ alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources. Freegans embrace community, generosity, social concern, freedom, cooperation, and sharing in opposition to a society based on materialism, moral apathy, competition, conformity, and greed.Logo_864

Freeganism is a sustainable practice that’s about creating alternatives and Do-It-Yourself habits. If you need fruits or vegetables, then don’t buy those from a capitalist company that exploits animals in the farms or people on the fields. Grow your own fruits and veggies. This is the real freedom  to produce goods on your own and with your friends, to create communities consisting of mutually supportive people and relationships. Freedom, solidarity, independence  this is FREEDOM.

dumpster to breakfast

Make sure to check these beauties: Freecycle.orgFreegan.infoTrashwiki.orgFoodisfree Food Not Bombs


Why it’s important to surround yourself with positive people

I wanted to write this article since a long time so here we are. That’s what I’ve learned over the years:

-Non positive people will let you feel down maybe more than you are already. Positive people encourage you, make you smile or laugh, they can also show you the bad AND the positive effects of any choice you’ve made.

-Positivity will bring you positivity. Same happens for negativity. You are what you think, so don’t be angry or sad, try to find solutions instead of problems.

-Problems are, unfortunately, everywhere. I mean, everyone got problems. More important sometimes, they got WORST problems then yours according to them and you probably think you’ve got worst problems than other persons. So……relax…be grateful every day for the gift of being alive. Time goes so swiftly. Everything can change in one second, depending on you: 10% is what happen to you, 90% is how you react to it.

-‘No’ does not means negativity. It’s right to say ‘No’, in any occasion where you feel unsafe or uncomfortable. Choose companions who respect your well-being, who are enthusiastic about life and want to do something wonderful.

-Positivity will bring you less stress, more relaxed time, you will forget a bit about the future and concentrate your thoughts in the present time. You will have more open doors.

-If you already have positive friends, nurture them. They are important: the majority of the society is already depressed and is looking for people to save them but they don’t really want to be ‘saved’. Make sure to have lonely time only for yourself, and the rest of the time, surround yourself with positive people.

Focus with positive energy and the negative doesn’t consume you.



Happy, Caring, Healthy and Sharing

happy-caring-healthy-sharing-a-book-for-young-green-vegans-graham-burnett-buy-online-300x300by Graham BURNETT

Green vegans believe in living compassionately, that is to say in living a happy and caring life that does not cause suffering to animals or the world around us.

Green vegans believe that such a way of life is also of direct benefit to our fellow human beings, for land that is at the moment used for animal farming or to grow cattle feed could be turned over to growing food suitable for humans. In countries found in Africa, Asia and Latin America especially, this would go a long way towards ending hunger and poverty.

As well as growing cattle feed, much of the land in ‘Third World’ countries is given over to growing ‘cash crops’, such as coffee, tea or sugar which are sent to Western countries. If demand from the West for meat and cash crops was to end, how do you think that land might be used? What crops do you think the people of these countries might grow to feed themselves?

The animals should be our friends, and free to live their own lives in peace. Vegans believe we should strive to live in harmony with the animals, and not simply use them for our own ends. There is no product that comes from animals that we cannot either do without completely or use a cruelty-free alternative to.

In the drawings you can see animals that are all used for our end in one way or another, but in this case they are living free in an animal sanctuary. Can you think in which way each animal is used by humans? Which of the products from each creature do you think we could do without altogether, and which could be replaced by products that do not come from animals?

Putting animals into zoos and circuses are two more unnecessary and unnatural ways in which we treat animals just for our pleasure- much more enjoyable and respectful is to have a nature walk. Why not go out into the countryside- maybe the woods or marshes- whatever is nearest to you- and see what animals you can observe in their natural habitat. Keep still and quiet and watch their behavior. Wild animals may be difficult to spot, but it’s much more fun when you do!

Cow’s milk is meant for the calf, not for human babies. In fact many children find it too rich, and in some cases even harmful. Human breast milk contains all the goodness that babies need for a healthy start in life. When we are older, the goodness and vitamins that we received in mother’s milk can be found in other foods, including some Soya milks, bread, nuts, seeds, fruit and green vegetables.

Alternatives to many dairy products can be made at home in the kitchen using vegan ingredients. Vegan ‘cheese’ can be made quickly and easily by mixing Soya flour, sunflower margarine and yeast extract. Soya milk by pressing cooked Soya beans.

Many green vegans prefer not to use Soya products, as these can be seen as a ‘cash crop’, using land overseas that should feed people there. They are not really necessary -‘milk’ can be made from nuts, and well cooked split peas can add a creamy texture to many dishes. Even ‘yoghurt’ can be made from porridge or sunflower seeds. Why not experiment and see what other dairy alternatives you can discover?

Green vegans believe that the food we eat is best grown locally, for this means it is fresher, and fuel and energy has not been wasted in bringing it long distances from where it was produced.

It is better still if we can grow our own food, or at least some of it, in our gardens or on an allotment, using vegan-organic methods, that is to say, not using harmful chemicals, and replacing animal manures with fertilizers like seaweed, compost or ‘green manure’.

Even if you don’t have any land for growing vegetables, there is much that can be grown indoors, just on a window ledge; herbs such as parsley or basil; mustard and cress grown on blotting paper; or beans, chick peas, field beans, alfalfa, fenugreek or barley. put them in a jam jar, and soak in water, which should be changed daily by draining through a piece of material. Within a few days edible shoots will appear. See how you get along with these, then why not try some others- you could even start you own indoor miniature farm!

If land was not wasted for animal farming, but grew only the crops we could eat directly, and if we all made an effort to grow some of our own food, far more land could be given over to tree planting (re-afforestation). As well as being a source of wonder and beauty in their own right, trees have many important uses and functions.

Their leaves give out oxygen, which keeps the air fresh and clean for us to breath. They also take in carbon dioxide, and store the carbon in their wood. We have put too much carbon dioxide into the air by burning coal (the trees that grew millions of years ago) and oil, which could have bad results on the climate.

Their roots reach down deep into the soil, and draw up water otherwise far beyond our reach.

Tree cover is a vital part of keeping soil fertile, and preventing erosion and the spread of deserts.

When sensibly managed, trees are also important as crops, giving us many different products such as timber for building and furniture, fibres, dyes, paper, medicines and fuel, as well as providing bountiful food for humans and animals in the form of beans, nuts and fruit.

Trees are also vital in supporting animal and plant communities (ecosystems)- how many animals can you spot living in or near the oak tree opposite? How many more animals can you think of that depend upon the oak tree, and would die if it were cut down? Find out and make a list.

Preparing a meal from home grown or locally produced ingredients is very rewarding, and also lots of fun. There are so many ingredients to try, and so many ways to cook them- using leeks, courgettes, oats, broccoli, hazelnuts, carrots, garlic, barley, pasta, cauliflower, tomatoes, onions, beans, walnuts, spinach, peas, artichokes, turnips, peppers, mushrooms, marrows, aubergines, sunflower seeds, parsnips, asparagus, rocket, cabbage, radishes, kale, sweet corn, lettuce, quinoa, almonds, chives, potatoes, chestnuts, cucumber, celery, endive, pumpkin, mustard, parsley, gooseberries, apples, plums, blackberries, raisins, cherries, rhubarb, peaches, figs, pears, strawberries, apricots, raspberries, red currants, you could make pies, stews, curries, soups, stir-frys, roasts, flans, dips, soufflés, casseroles, loaves, tarts, crumbles, cakes or biscuits….and how many more can you think of?

Sharing a meal with people you care about, like your family of friends is also great fun. Why don’t you prepare some foods, say vegetable pasties, a salad or sandwiches, and organise a picnic with people you know at one of your favourite outdoor spots? Or if the weather isn’t so nice, you could always prepare a special meal indoors-get your friends to bring something nice to eat as well, then you could share out the food between you.

The good, wholesome foods that make up a balanced vegan diet, together with the active, creative and aware way of life that a person with a ‘green’ outlook leads, tends to promote fitness and health in both mind and body. Green vegans tend to take part in outdoor activities, such as walking, cycling, camping, gardening, or maybe conservation work, or exploring the countryside.

There are many vegans doing well in sporting activities- some who have been vegan all their lives have gained notable achievements in various fields of athletics. In fast there is a yearly marathon held by and for vegetarians and vegans which is always well attended. Many experts on sporting activities recommend a diet which is high in fresh fruit and vegetables rather than one based on animal products.

Do you enjoy sport and outdoor activities? What are you best at? Is it the one that you enjoy the most, maybe swimming or running? Or hockey or football? Or perhaps cycling or rambling? An important thing that is worth remembering is that being Number One isn’t really what matters, the main thing is to know inside that YOU have done your best, and that you’ve had a lot of fun too!




Vegans Around the World

Click here for the video

We can say whatever we want: that being vegan is a hype or that we are extreme … but in the meantime everyone of these people change things in everyday life. “Vegan” can have a thousand definitions but above all it is unconditional love! ….. 😍💞

A year ago, I was starting this project around the world … I am grateful that destiny allowed me to meet and know you. I hope our paths will cross again soon. THANK YOU TO BE PART OF THE CHANGE . Take care

VEGANISM has no border, no nationality, no age, no gender, no language, no physical apparences or skin colors….

Hippie life, happy life?

Definition of hippie: noun

a person, especially of the late 1960s, who rejected established institutions and values and sought spontaneity, direct personal relations expressing love, and expanded consciousness, often expressed externally in the wearing of casual, folksy clothing and of beads, headbands, used garments, etc.
Definition of happiness: noun
1. the quality or state of being happy.
2. good fortune; pleasure; contentment; joy.
This is Rufus,
where I used to live for five months when I was working and travelling in Australia.
This was the kitchen 🙂 simple cooking, no oven…That’s where I realised cooking was important to me.
kitchen rufus
This is where I used to drive, eat, sleep but also laugh, cry.
Sans titre
food travelling

This is where I couldn’t possess a lot of THINGS (compared to a permanent residence), couldn’t accumulate so much things but this is where I enjoyed my life the most. This is where I felt that we are all ants. This is where I’ve learnt so much about people, possessions, society, ways of living, and…myself. This is where I had the worst feelings but almost all, the better ones!….This is where “problems” was not a word we could use because we should find solutions quickly.



This is where I haven’t accumulate things, and while working, spent this money for food and hobbies, so did enjoy MOMENTS.

I hope you guys could also experience life like that : simple, easy, cheap, experience moments not things and realise problems are not problems, become or stay grateful of what you have and are right now, work hard for your dreams….

I am not this hair, I am not this skin, I am the soul that lives within. – Rumi